Money Smart Kids

En Espanol

Making good choices in managing your money is an important life skill. Teaching your children how to manage money and spend wisely can start at the library—where their first lesson is about taking advantage of the library’s free resources.

@ YOUR LIBRARY

  • Ask for recommendations on digital or print resources that introduce concepts about money to your young children.
  • See what programs on raising money smart kids you can attend together. Some public libraries partner with local banks and other financial institutions to address topics from budgeting, saving and banking basics to credit cards, identity theft and financial aid for college.

AT HOME & IN THE COMMUNITY

  • Grocery shopping. The FDIC recommends playing “show and tell” with your money. When a child asks for something at the grocery store or on a family outing, explain what makes it too expensive or a good buy.
  • How much does your family save by using the library? Check out the online library value calculator at www.ilovelibraries.org/calculator.
  • Family budgeting. Talk to your kids and teens about budgeting. Ask for their ideas on how to save money and making choices between “wants” and “needs.”
St. Justine Pre-School & Learning Center, Newark, NJ, Pictured:  Children's Libr

Especially these days, it is never too early to gain financial literacy.

Several libraries are stepping up to provide financial information to pre-schoolers that they ultimately will be able to take to the bank.

One of them, the Newark Public Library has received a $305,694 grant from the PNC Foundation to support financial education for preschoolers.

Through its signature cause, Grow Up Great , PNC has is spending $350 million over several years to enhance early childhood education and school readiness.

Driver's education car

In today’s economy, it’s more likely that your teen will hassle you to borrow the car keys rather than taking their own set of wheels out for a spin. You can easily turn this scenario into a teaching moment. While she works toward that all-important American rite of passage – acquiring a vehicle of her own – send her to the library to brush up on financial literacy and information literacy, two skills that are vital part of responsible auto ownership.

Research Responsibly

Dad talking with teens

From DVD late fees to ATM service charges, it’s the little things that can add up.